Citizens’ agenda
Local elections 2019

North Inner-City

21 candidates competing for 7 seats
 

First things first I would never vote against any development of social housing or affordable housing. We have a Fine Gael government at the helm and we have to work with what we have while always pushing for more. If needed I would try amend any plans to make sure the development went smoothly but I would never vote against the delivery of homes. I would continuously call on government to adopt housing policies that would work better than the ones we’ve seen this far. My parties policy is social and affordable homes for those who need it. I would follow through on plans already in place and continue to try convince a government heavily reliant on the private housing market to fund and support alternative proposal that would actually work. I wouldn’t promise people this is what we could have like other councillors have in the past. If we had a change in government we would be able to change the delivery mechanism for social and affordable housing but until we have we need to work with what we have and deliver some homes rather than none. I would continue to do what I have since elected five years ago. This is on my election manifesto.

The state needs to build social housing, even if this means transgressing the laws set by the EU. For too long housing supply has been left to the private sector, leading to a complete failure to address the housing needs of working families, single workers, the unemployed, students and those who are generally on the margins of society. Local authorities and state agencies own a vast amount of land around the city. But Fine Gael want to hand it over to private developers who will charge high prices for homes. This should be resisted and the public land should be used to build social and affordable housing at cheaper rates.

People Before Profit has campaigned for:

1) The declaration of a national housing emergency to release funds for local authority and affordable housing;

2) The holding of a referendum to insert a "right to housing" clause into the Irish constitution;

3) The creation of a national construction company to take control of building supply;

4) A five-year programme to house 100,000 families and individuals in secure, permanent public housing;

5) Raising the income thresholds for public housing to €60,000 per annum. People on modest incomes should be able to be housed through state provision;

6) An end to gentrification: the south and north inner-city areas are being saturated with aparthotels, hotels and student accommodation, with few or no social and affordable homes. Local people are being driven out of the city for the sake of profit. Dublin's inner-city will be a dead zone except for tourism in the next decade. We will put a halt to this policy and re-generate inner-city council property.

Yes. I support the need for affordable homes, to build homes.

If elected to the city council on 24 May I will campaign for the establishment of the office of directly elected Lord Mayor for Dublin with executive powers and a budget to run the city. This is a long-term objective of the Labour Party and we believe that such an office would facilitate a resolution of the difficult issues of the day such as housing and homelessness, transport and climate change. Housing and homelessness are a national scandal and will be the biggest challenge facing the new city council.

In March of this year over 10,000 men, women and children were homeless. This is the first time the number exceeded 10,000. Despite all the plans and targets the situation is deteriorating. Dublin City Council is the statutory body with responsibility for housing in the city. To date, it has failed dismally to fulfil that responsibility and builds only a handful of housing units each year. If elected, I will insist on the city council fulfilling its statutory remit and building social and affordable housing on city council and state-owned land of which there is an adequate supply within the city boundaries.

The city council must stop relying on the private and voluntary sectors to do what it should be doing itself. Renting accommodation in Dublin is exorbitant. The rental market has become dysfunctional with the most expensive rents only 1.8 times the cheapest compared to other countries, where the most expensive rents would be triple the cheapest. This dysfunctional market condemns low and middle- income earners to rental poverty.

Young working couples find it impossible to rent and save for a home of their own. I will urge my fellow councillors to declare a housing emergency, halt evictions and introduce stringent rent control for the duration of the housing crisis. Homelessness is at unprecedented levels. It is exacerbated by high rents and shortage of housing supply. However, no child or family should ever be homeless. A moratorium on evictions would go a long way to protecting families against becoming homeless. Restoration of the local authority grants for building extensions for overcrowded families would help to prevent homelessness in many instances.

Derelict sites and vacant properties are a valuable resource for housing. At present, they are an eyesore and a blight on neighbourhoods all over Dublin. The derelict sites tax should be increased and rigorously enforced and the powers to compulsory purchase such properties should be increased in proportion to the housing need. Large numbers of underused family homes are also available where the elderly occupants are looking to engage with Dublin City Council for smaller senior citizen accommodation but cannot because of the 8-10 year waiting list.

An urgent programme by the city council to build senior citizen complexes is required. I would also designate the entire country a Housing Approved Payment (HAP) area so that families and individuals on the housing and homeless list who might wish to transfer out of Dublin would have the option to do so.

If re-elected I will seek funding from central government for the staff and funding to build public housing. I'll also try and reduce the red tape around housing. Currently Dublin City Council has to go through a four-stage approval process when we wish to build. That needs to be simplified.There is also scope to use innovate finance from credit unions, semi-state pension funds, and allowing councils to issue bonds, but that requires central government action.

Invest in quick and easy-to-build modular housing projects which would also be cheaper and more affordable. Support social-housing proposals that come before Dublin City Council with the realistic time-frame of completion and low costs of building. Enforcing compulsory purchase orders (after some specified time-frame) but only from the vulture funds and investment groups who are just “sitting on a land” and waiting for its value to increase.

Build public housing on zoned public lands led by local authorities. There is enough land to build 114,000 homes in Dublin. Increase supply by enforcement of CPOs on empty properties in Dublin owned by investment groups, not family-owned. Have a set time frame to turn around council properties that have been vacated.

The current housing crisis is due to bad government and bad decision-making. Government expenditure on social housing in 2019 is projected at €1.3 billion with a target of 7,410 real social houses. Sinn Féin would increase this by a further €1 billion to double the output of public housing. This would deliver an additional 2,850 social homes, consisting of 1,500 new-builds, Part Vs and acquisitions, 950 vacant units via Buy and Renew and 400 units of Traveller-specific accommodation. This would bring the total number of social houses delivered in 2019 to 10,260, which is what was recommended by the Cross-Party Housing and Homeless Committee report. This government has not delivered one affordable home in 2016, 2017 or 2018 and it has no affordable-housing targets for next year. Sinn Féin would deliver 4,630 affordable homes of which 1,435 would be cost rental and 3,195 would be affordable sale.

In the last five years, Dublin City Council has built no social or affordable homes in the north inner-city yet at the same time, thousands of student accommodation units have been built. It has become totally unaffordable for working people to rent or buy a home. This is unacceptable. State-owned lands should be used to deliver public housing and all city-council flat complexes to be redeveloped and brought-up to modern building standards.

–Create further zoned development land in the Docklands by expanding the land area of Dublin from land reclamation over the next 20-25 years and create an industrial zone akin to ‘La Defense’ in Paris.

–Lobby for extra funding from the government to fund such developments further.

–Support develop areas plans that build higher and support the preservation of quality green spaces.

–Fight against the growth of short term lettings within Dublin city to ensure houses aren’t lost from the housing stock.

–This housing crisis must be addressed, now. People have a right to housing and I will support efforts to include it within the Irish Constitution.

As a person who lives in Direct Provision, I know and I have the first hand experience with what it like to be uncertain in your home and to worry about where you will have to move to. I believe that a secure and decent home where people and families can flourish, is something that every person in this city and country is entitled to. The housing crisis is a national problem, but Dublin City Council has a big part to play in the solution. We need massive investment in the traditional social-housing construction, but this must be alongside increased investment in a cost-rental housing.

As Dublin is facing the biggest housing crisis in its history, the rents are increasing over any limit of affordability. If the trend continues, we'll see people sharing rooms, not only houses just to be able to pay the rent. I believe that building more affordable homes should be a priority for any future councillors. I've expressed my ideas about housing at a meeting organized by the European Commission and everyone was very open to my proposals. We need to take concrete steps to tackle the housing problem.

As leader of the Fine Gael Group on Dublin City Council, it is my objective that as many Fine Gael councillors are returned to the council after May’s local elections. With a strengthened mandate, Fine Gael councillors will work to advance and implements proposals under the Land Use Initiative and the Estate Renewal Plan to increase the supply of public housing in Dublin. That means ensuring the work underway in O’Devaney Gardens is completed to ensure that 700 new homes are built and that the former Department of Defence lands are used to provide further public housing in addition to what has already been granted planning permission on the O’Devaney lands.

With regards the Estate Renewal Plan, a strengthened Fine Gael team on Dublin City Council will seek to advance Part VIII planning applications to either refurbish or redevelop the existing 240 housing complexes across Dublin city, so that better and new public housing is delivered between now and 2024.

To increase the supply of social and affordable homes, there is a simple solution and this is to build more social and affordable housing. The stark reality is that we are not building anything like the number of social houses we require for a population of our size. The reason for this is a lack of political will. I want to see quality social housing as a key priority of local and national government and I will use the platform the council gives me, if elected, to push for this, both in my own party and as a city councillor. I feel passionately about this because the right to a home should be a basic entitlement for everyone and the state does have an obligation. I am a republican and this is surely what “cherishing all the children of the nation equally means". The performance of the present government is pitiful. Right now, we are building 4,000 houses a year. This is nowhere near good enough. I don’t absolve my own party from blame as we are part of the confidence-and-supply arrangement. I will be making it bluntly clear, both through Fianna Fáil’s internal structures and as a city councillor, that a message needs to be delivered to the taoiseach that housing is at crisis levels in our city and that if it is not adequately dealt with than the government is no longer entitled to our party’s support.

By working with the city council and with central government I would hope to highlight the many "voids" [empty social homes] in my area as well as the many sites that could be used for social and affordable housing

The current housing crisis is due to bad government and bad decision making. Government expenditure on social housing in 2019 is projected at €1.3 billion with a target of 7,410 real social houses. Sinn Féin would increase this by a further €1 billion to double the output of public housing. This would deliver an additional 2,850 social homes, consisting of 1,500 new builds, Part Vs and acquisitions, 950 vacant units via Buy and Renew and 400 units of Traveller-specific accommodation. This would bring the total number of social houses delivered in 2019 to 10,260, which is what was recommended by the Cross-Party Housing and Homeless Committee report. This government has not delivered one affordable home in 2016, 2017 or 2018 and it has no affordable-housing targets for next year. Sinn Féin would deliver 4,630 affordable homes of which 1,435 would be cost rental and 3,195 would be affordable sale.

I am the only councillor in the north inner-city to have consistently voted against the sell-off of public land for private development. Using public land exclusively for public housing would remain the main plank of our housing policy in the next term. As a councillor I would:

1) Oppose the sale of any council-owned land for private, for-profit development, and ask all state bodies to impose a moratorium on the sale of public land to private actors;

2) Put forward costed proposals for 100 percent public, mixed-income housing on council-owned land like O'Devaney Gardens and in Ballymun. These new developments would remain owned by the council, and have a mix of both low- and middle-income tenants, many of whom would not necessarily qualify for traditional social housing, but can't afford Dublin rents. Homes would be rented with lifetime security, with rents linked to income – i.e. wealthier tenants would pay more – and with a strong emphasis on open, green space and facilities;

3) Introduce a new zoning category in the city development plan, for "affordable housing", justified by the fact that the current "residential" zoning category is not currently serving its intended purpose of ensuring sufficient supply of affordable homes in the city;

4) Use the development plan to introduce restrictions on for-profit development such as luxury apartments, and unaffordable student housing;

5) Push city officials to increase applications for borrowing to invest in the delivery of cost-rental housing (as described above);

6) Campaign for a citywide referendum to nationalise institutional landlords, similar to Berlin;

7) There is much more that needs to be done at national level – nonetheless, councillors CAN stop the sell-off of public land, and this is the key first step to tackling the housing crisis.

In relation to height, the Workers' Party believes medium-height building - not sprawling suburbs - is the way to tackle the housing crisis, and build walkable, liveable neighbourhoods. We support appropriate multi-storey development, and believe Dublin must become a city in which apartments are lifelong homes, for families and everyone else. The 'trade off' to building more apartments must be that those living in them have lots of green space in exchange. However, currently, the housing crisis is being used as an excuse to push for high rise developments that are either non-residential, or are either luxury apartments, or extremely poor quality, and targetting transient populations. This is not the way to build apartment-living in Dublin.

 

Sinn Féin has put many proposals forward to protect renters, particularly in relation to the high rents and the lack of security. We would continue to push that agenda. This is on my election manifesto.

The government has deliberately allowed rents to rise so that they now consume nearly half of many people’s weekly incomes. People Before Profit councillors will back up any tenant fighting evictions. We shall mount a city-wide campaign for reduction in rents and for rent controls. Rents in high pressure areas are too high and this is leading to social cleansing. The poor are being pushed to the outer suburbs. Rents must be reduced to 2011 levels and only landlords who show clear evidence of improvement should be allowed to increase rents above this. Simultaneously, we need real rent caps. Rents should be based on transparent criteria and rent increases are linked to the Consumer Price Index. Tenants must be given greater security of tenure.

Yes. I oppose landlords who put up rents or give families notice to quit. DCC need to have a say on the rent issues. Government must play a role to prevent rent increases.

Increasing housing supply is crucial, but we also need to move towards the cost-rental model as is in place in cities like Vienna. I've been to Austria and I've seen what can be done. We need to build, and build in the numbers necessary to tackle the housing crisis. Rent caps, and strict limits on evictions in order to increase tenant security are also required.

Change the cap on the possible rent increases from 4 percent to 2 percent per year. Establish the upper-limits of the rents for different types of houses and apartments that can only increase together with the income increases along with the national minimum wage increases and the inflation.

Cap rents while we are in the middle of a housing emergency. Set affordable rents as a realistic percentage of income. Increase security of tenure for all tenants in rental accommodation.

Sinn Féin would introduce measures to curb rising rents. Rent prices are the highest in the history of the state and are continuing to rise. These rent hikes are unsustainable and are adding to a growing cost-of-living crisis. The government’s weak rent-pressure zone legislation isn’t working. Therefore, Sinn Féin propose the introduction of a temporary tax relief for renters in tandem with a three-year emergency rent freeze. This relief would cost €265 million per year. This tax relief will cover the price of one month’s rent for every renter in the state for a period of three years. It will be capped at €1,500 per renter, and will be refundable to ensure working people on low incomes benefit. Under the emergency rent freeze, existing tenancies would have rents frozen at their current levels. Any new tenancies would be pegged to the Residential Tenancies Board's standardised average rent index by county, and where appropriate local electoral area, from budget day.

Unfortunately, the powers of local city councilors in this area are limited. The general solution is increased housing supply to reduce the price of rent. However, increasing the enforcement budget of the housing authority in Dublin City Council to ensure adequate inspections are carried out across the city for building regulations and raise the bar for removing tenants from properties for renovations would also be a good idea. There should be a prohibition on rent advertisements being "student-only" as it is a form of discrimination to ordinary people simply looking for a place to live. I will work with my party colleagues to ensure that this crisis is addressed on a national level.

The cost-rental solution would bring a massive amount of publicly owned affordable rental homes to people who traditionally haven’t been able to access public or affordable houses. I think that expecting the private market to deliver homes that people can afford by itself won’t work – though rent controls and controls on evictions have a massive part to play.

As mentioned before, high rents are a burning problem in our lives. Many people cannot meet the rent increases and are forced out of the city, and at this time we see more investment in office buildings which, in my honest opinion, feels like turning the back to the citizens.

We implement the Land Use Initiative which includes an affordable-rental scheme. Dublin City Council needs to take a more urgent approach to fleshing out the objectives of this plan so that affordable-rental housing is delivered in Dublin in a way that hasn’t been to date.

Again, we need to increase supply in the private rented sector and we need to ensure that rents are fair and affordable. I believe that rent levels should be capped in the capital at a fair rate set by an independent arbitration panel. I also believe that people, especially young people, living and working in Dublin are at a financial disadvantage as the cost of rents and the cost of living is far, far higher in our capital city than elsewhere in the country. I will be bringing forward a motion to create a "dublin allowance", which will mean people renting (or struggling with a mortgage) in Dublin will get an allowance in their tax or in their social welfare, which ever is applicable.

This isn't something that city councillor has control over. Realistically, the only way we can do this is by building more homes, therefore creating the supply to meet the current demand.

Sinn Féin would introduce measures to curb rising rents. Rent prices are the highest in the history of the state and are continuing to rise. These rent hikes are unsustainable and are adding to a growing cost-of-living crisis. The government’s weak rent-pressure zone legislation isn’t working. Therefore, Sinn Féin propose the introduction of a temporary tax relief for renters in tandem with a three-year emergency rent freeze. This relief would cost €265 million per year. This tax relief will cover the price of one month’s rent for every renter in the state for a period of three years. It will be capped at €1,500 per renter, and will be refundable to ensure working people on low incomes benefit. Under the emergency rent freeze, existing tenancies would have rents frozen at their current levels. Any new tenancies would be pegged to the Residential Tenancies Board's standardised average rent index by county and where appropriate local electoral area as appropriate from budget day.

Radically increasing the supply of publicly owned housing (for both low- and middle-income tenants) is the best way to drive down rents. Most changes to private rental sector legislation must come from the national government, and I will continue to campaign for measures to drive down rents, and introduce lifetime leases as standard. In addition, in terms of what I can do as a councillor, I would:

1) Increase funding to monitor illegal short-term lettings, and lobby for changes to national legislation to ban them entirely;

2) Amend the development plan to prohibit changes of use for buildings from residential to holiday letting/commercial;

3) Introduce a reference to "affordability" into the City Development Plan so that when a new building is applying for planning permission, it has to submit an "affordability assessment" along with its environmental assessment, which shows the likely affordability for an average worker of whatever accommodation is being proposed.

 

I would continue to do what I have done for the last five years. Call on Fine Gael to call a national emergency, and build social and affordable homes on our land. Also make the rental market more secure for tenants, make sure rents can’t keep rising and that homes are properly maintained. This is on my election manifesto.

We could create a national construction company to take control of building supply. There should be no evictions where there is genuine economic distress. People Before profit supports:

1) Transfering 20,000 Nama housing units to local authorities. Nama has failed the public –we need to change its mandate and take back housing units for those on waiting lists;

2) A clamp-down on short-term letting for tourism or corporate rental in this time of the housing emergency;

3) Stopping the sell-off of public land to private developers at knock-down prices;

4) Fine Gael wants to sell off as much public land as cheaply as possible to their developer friends. This must be stopped. Public land should be used for council housing and community amenities;

5) The imposition of a vacant-dwelling levy. There are over 200,000 vacant properties in Ireland – even though thousands have no home. We need a "use it or lose it policy" whereby private property owners will pay a special levy if their property is left empty for more than six months (except under particular circumstances such as probate);

6) The use of compulsory purchase orders. In some cases a levy will not be enough. If the public good demands it, the state should be able to use a CPO to attain appropriate accommodation;

7) PBP also supports specific drug- and drink-free hostels so that those in recovery or at risk can still use homeless services in an emergency, and the introduction of legal measures to outlaw discrimination: an end to “Rent allowance not accepted”. Too many landlords discriminate against people on government-led schemes. PBP would outlaw this practice.

Yes. I support the need to address homelessness.

Increased housing supply and a "Housing First" approach will help. Ten years ago we had 1,400 homeless beds. We now have 2,300, and people are still unable to be accommodated. This is wrong and housing construction needs to be prioritised by the Department of Housing instead of hostels and family hubs.

Again, build more quick modular houses and additionally set aside the good percentage of them to be available only for homeless people for free while the rest of the modular houses can be let by local authorities to the people with the social-housing needs on the Mortgage to Rent scheme. If the needs of homeless are satisfied first then invest in proper public housing (which might be more time- and resources-consuming) in the following years.

Implement a Housing First policy offering six-month beds with on-site wrap-around supports for rough sleepers. Eliminate overnight hostels. Enforce CPOs to take families from emergency accommodation into proper homes. Cap rents and enforce a better security of tenure for tenants. Ban the sale of mortgages, performing and non-performing, to vulture funds. Expand the Mortgage to Rent scheme to include people that aren’t eligible for social housing. Build public housing, local authority-led, on available zoned land. Build communities.

With over 10,000 adults and nearly 4,000 children living in emergency accommodation, decisive, urgent action needs to be taken. Sinn Féin in government would deliver over 10,000 new social homes in 2019, which would allow local authorities to reduce the number of families in emergency accommodation. We would also commit to introducing 1,000 Housing First tenancies from within the overall provision of social housing to reduce long-term homelessness. We would invest €5 million towards the establishment of a quality standards framework and inspection regime.

Best research has shown internationally that given the longer-term costs to the city, direct housing provision is the best long-term solution. There is no easy answer to this matter as it can be a conflux of simultanous problems, from relationship break-downs and rent increases for example.

On a national level, we need adequate mental-health services with residential care provisions and drug decriminalisation in order to minimise the potential for homelessness.

We need to limit the grounds on which a landlord can evict tenants and ensure that these grounds are used only when necessary. At the end of 2016 the government introduced a rent-control measures that limited rent increases to 4 percent [per year] but many people in this area and beyond have not felt the benefit of these protections. We need proper protection for renters. We need a rent register to close to close the loopholes in the rent-control system, so people can know for sure what a lawful rent is.

This subject is worrying as we see a constant increase in people living on the streets. This is directly related to the rent increases and the impossibility of payingthe high rents demanded by landlords. The council should work to find ways to tackle and reduce homelessness in Dublin, especially because of the alarming number of children living on the streets.

Build more homes. There are already a number of redevelopment projects ongoing across the city that our Fine Gael-led Government has provided direct funding towards. I, personally, am working with residents in Constitution Hill, Matt Talbot Court and other complexes across the North Inner City to ensure that in refurbishing existing housing complexes that we also use the opportunity to further expand those complexes to provide better quality homes for existing tenants and people seeking alternative accommodation through Dublin City Council.

This, however, is only one approach that is needed. Implementing Housing First and ensuring that individuals and families stay in their homes is the most effective means of reducing homelessness. As someone who rents myself, I think there continues to be a need to better inform both tenants and landlords of their rights and responsibilities. Too many of both, that I deal with, don’t know what their entitlements are as tenants nor responsibilities as landlords. This problem, I believe is further exacerbating the situation in the privately rented sector.

Homelessness is a sad blight on the face of modern Ireland. Every single person on this island is entitled to a place called home and it is a failure on the part of local and national legislators that we have a homelessness crisis. The state has to take responsibility. At the moment, we need more emergency accommodation, but we also need lasting solutions. In Dublin, we have to build more social housing and we have to make renting more attractive and sustainable. I would like to see a constitutional referendum on the rights of everyone to own their own home, as this will set an obligation for all future governments. I would also like to see meaningful housing targets set by each local authority in the country, including Dublin City Council.

There are many different charities and NGOs along with DCC that are trying to reduce the number of homeless while also working with those in emergency accommodation. I would like to engage with these groups and see if we can get all the different stakeholders working together

With over 10,000 adults and nearly 4,000 children living in emergency accommodation decisive, urgent action needs to be taken. Sinn Féin in government would deliver over 10,000 new social homes in 2019, which would allow local authorities to reduce the number of families in emergency accommodation. We would also commit to introducing 1,000 Housing First tenancies from within the overall provision of social housing to reduce long-term homelessness. We would invest €5 million towards the establishment of a quality standards framework and inspection regime.

Radically increasing the supply of publicly owned housing (for both low- and middle-income tenants) is the best way to drive down homelessness. This is fully within councillors' control, if they stop selling off public land.

 

I would call for heavy fines for those who leave sites derelict and vacant. Call on the government to fund the buying of the lands and vacant properties to help with the housing crisis.

As stated above PBP supports:

1) The imposition of a vacant-dwelling levy. There are over 200,000 vacant properties in Ireland – even though thousands have no home. We need a "use it or lose it policy" whereby private property owners will pay a special levy if their property is left empty for more than six months (except under particular circumstances such as probate);

2) The use of compulsory purchase orders. In some cases a levy will not be enough. If the public good demands it, the state should be able to use a CPO to attain appropriate accommodation.

Property rights are making it difficult for the council to take action. We need to be clear. The right to the common good trumps the right to private property. It is wrong that buildings are sitting empty for more than twenty years. I'll try and establish a hit squad to tackle long-term vacant property (including state-owned lands such as court offices on Smithfield that have been empty for twenty years), and I'll seek a report on these every month until the problem is solved.

Introduce the vacant property levy after some specified period of inactivity. Support local authorities in acquisition of the derelict properties.

Enforce CPOs on properties and lands owned by profit-driven investment firms. Louth County Council is leading the way with over 100 CPOs already enforced. An estimated 30,000 properties are vacant and could be brought back online to home families. As land value increases 12 percent per year, investment firms are sitting on properties to maximise profits and this needs to be addressed.

Councils need to take a more proactive approach. This would require dedicated vacant-homes officers going out and engaging with owners to encourage them to avail of the available schemes. These officers should build up a vacant-home register and be working to a vacant-homes plan. A vacant-homes tax needs to operate in conjunction with these refurbishment schemes to further incentivise property owners wilfully leaving homes empty to return their empty properties to use. Any vacant-homes tax also needs to be more than a token gesture and must be punitive in nature. In Sinn Féin’s submission to the government’s vacant-homes strategy, we outlined a number of approaches the government could take to implementing such a tax, such as making it based on a percentage of the market value of the property. However, in advance of the introduction of such a measure, a state-wide vacant-homes register must be rolled out. We need to know how many vacant homes will actually be available for refurbishment and where they are. Key to developing this register would be dedicated vacant-homes officers employed by local authorities. A huge part of their role would be to engage with vacant property owners and encourage them to return them back into use.

Fight to have the Vacant Sites Levy be index-linked with the value of the property. That way if a property’s value rises by more than 3 percent (the current rate of the levy) there will be a greater incentive for the property owner to develop or sell the vacant property thus increasing the supply of housing within the north inner-city.

Drive a campaign to the government to ensure that land rezoned from industrial use to residential does not result in a colossal windfall by imposing a windfall tax.

We need a higher tax on vacant and derelict homes and land – so that it’s no longer profitable for people to hoard properties that could be homes for the ordinary people of Dublin.

I could never understand how the council can allow so many buildings to stay unused and vacant when so many people have no roof over their heads. In a crisis situation like the one we are facing today, every building should be put at use. I'm convinced that there are organisations offering support to homeless people and families in distress that would more than happy take over those buildings and put them at good use.

I will continue to undertake the work I have been doing on this throughout the past five years. In 2017, I called upon Dublin City Council to take much more proactive approach to dealing with derelict and vacant properties. I sought to encourage the council to use its compulsory purchase powers under the Derelict Sites Act 1990 and I can report that this is happening. Properties across Stoneybatter, Phibsborough and Ballybough are now being refurbished by Dublin City Council following their compulsory acquisition and when ready, will be used to house both individuals and families who are homeless and those on the housing list.

I will bring forward proposals to demand that if a site is derelict or vacant for too long that ownership is forfeited too the city council. I will also ask for a system of meaningful fines to be introduced. Too many developers and property tycoons are sitting on vacant sites as part of a speculative strategy, waiting for prices to go up. In other cases, it is just a sheer lack of civic responsibility. Derelict and vacant sites are an eyesore and can be a danger, especially to children. Such vacant sites are hogging space when we need to use all of the city’s resources to house our people and to provide proper amenities. It is in the power of the city council to stamp out derelict and vacant properties and sites and make them a thing of the past. I want to work with like-minded colleagues to address this.

We need to encourage development of these lands. The north inner-city has many vacant properties and DCC is the largest land hoarder in the country. We need to start using what we have now, instead of waiting for things we don't have to come down the line.

Councils need to take a more proactive approach. This would require dedicated vacant-homes officers going out and engaging with owners to encourage them to avail of the available schemes. These officers should build up a vacant-home register and be working to a vacant-homes plan. A vacant-homes tax needs to operate in conjunction with these refurbishment schemes to further incentivise property owners wilfully leaving homes empty to return their empty properties to use. Any vacant-homes tax also needs to be more than a token gesture and must be punitive in nature. In Sinn Féin’s submission to the government’s vacant-homes strategy, we outlined a number of approaches the government could take to implementing such a tax, such as making it based on a percentage of the market value of the property. However, in advance of the introduction of such a measure, a state-wide vacant-homes register must be rolled out. We need to know how many vacant homes will actually be available for refurbishment and where they are. Key to developing this register would be dedicated vacant-homes officers employed by local authorities. A huge part of their role would be to engage with vacant property owners and encourage them to return them back into use.

At a local level, I would push for officials to drastically increase the number of properties which are CPOed once on the Derelict Sites Register. I would also lobby for national government to expand the definition of "dereliction" to include long-term vacancy, not just buildings that are causing a hazard, and for the radical restructuring of the Vacant Sites Levy so that it applies to both buildings and sites, and is high enough that no company is willing to pay it in order to be allowed to hoard land. Currently, the levy is lower than the increase in land value, so developers can pay the levy and still turn a profit because the land they hoard increases in value.

I would campaign for a "vacant property clawback tax" under which, when a piece of land or a building is sold following a period of being left vacant, the increase in price since the land was first bought is taxed at 90 percent. This would prevent land hoarding, under which speculators buy and hold onto land simply waiting for its value to increase.

 

Work with communities and the NTA to deliver projects that will actually work and that the majority are happy with. Some of the plans on the table in relation to BusConnects at the moment are shockingly bad.

In general terms PBP favours a major shift to public transport and the prioritisation of public transport and cycling across the city, but particularly in the centre of Dublin. This is not just good for the people of Dublin, but can help in the fight against climate change. We need to follow countries like Luxembourg and make public transport free. We need major investment in public transport – expand the bus fleet nationally and in Dublin, increase rail services on suburban lines. We support the electrification of transport as far as is possible. Following an expansion of public-transport services we will support the restriction of car use.

DCC have no role in transport. We can pass motions and send them to the minster for transport. I would use my position to address by motions to the SPC policy committees and then hold the minster to account.

Public transport is very poor in Dublin. The transport committee of the city council has lacked a coherent approach to planning a city transport system. I believe that a Dublin Transport Authority needs to be established to plan and supervise the transport system in Dublin. A whole new fleet of electric buses is required. There must be practical incentives to use public transport.

There should be park and ride facilities along all bus and rail routes and fares should be very reasonable or at token levels during peak hours to entice commuters out of their cars. To protect fragile urban communities a congestion charge should be introduced to reduce private transport between the canals.

BusConnects is good in principle but in some areas has taken a bulldozer approach to green space, heritage and trees. This is wrong. I want inter-disciplinary design teams that can bring communities, landscapers, and place-makers around the table to improve the public realm, and public transport. We need to move away from engineers' obsessions with "parallel lines" on the map. We also need to lower fares, and increase the number of buses as we've less in service than 10 years ago.

Increase the bus and Luas services as well as invest in the alternative public transport like electric cars hire, bicycles for hire, and maybe in the future also the electric bicycles and e-scooters which could also be easy to let via the phone app and/or the Leap Card.

Increase the number of buses on the busiest commuter routes to avoid overcrowding. Address anti-social behaviour on buses, Luas and trains by increasing security and rolling out an option to text in real-time reports of incidents in transit similar to Luas. Extend train services to suburbs currently only serviced by bus to reduce road traffic and times of journeys.

In terms of addressing disabilities, Sinn Féin advocates a multi-annual programme to make public transport accessible for citizens with a disability. Sinn Féin support the greater streamlining of our transport infrastructure across Dublin. Transport needs to be modern and future-proofed as part of a modern infrastructure system. In terms of the MetroLink and BusConnects proposals, which plan to radically overhaul transport, we have made submissions ensuring that transport is more efficient and accessible, particularly for those with disabilities and our elderly citizens.

Again, unfortunately this is a policy area not currently within the remit of powers for councilors at local level. Increased infrastructural development across Ireland to improve services is a core priority for Fianna Fáil at national level. If a directly elected mayor for Dublin becomes a reality in the future, I would support efforts to have give that office clear powers in relation to transport development for the city.

For Dublin, reliability is the greatest issue and the lack of orbital bus routes across Dublin for the bus network. I support the principle of BusConnects. However, I do not believe the current plans proposed which put the development of one community above another as fair or sustainable for the development of Dublin city.

Dublin is a changing city. This means that our transport network needs to work for our diverse, growing population. As a councillor I will work to make getting around our city safer, easier and more fair for all, to ensure a sustainable public transport network that is fit for a modern, diverse city of the 21st century, while maintaining the historical character that makes Dublin the beautiful city that it is.

I've travelled to many countries and Ireland has some of the most expensive public transport. There are no proper investments in public transport in order to make this a real alternative to personal cars. Dublin has potential when it comes to public transport, but it feels that this aspect is always at the bottom of priority list.

I don’t think it’s so much what I can do individually, rather as a city council we need to ensure that MetroLink is delivered and that BusConnects is advanced. I know that both projects are contentious but our city is growing and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. The NTA needs to ensure that where there issues of particular concern to communities like mine in Stoneybatter and across the North Inner City that they are addressed and I am confident that will happen.

Major public transport infrastructure like Metro and BusConnects will help ensure we have the capacity to expand over the next 20 to 30 years. In the past 18 months alone, the NTA has approved the expansion of the Dublin Bus fleet to in excess of 1,100 buses. We need a plan therefore, that can enable further expansion to take place. I have heard other political parties talk about the need for a congestion charge to be introduced in Dublin, similar to that which is in place in London. I cannot support such a measure if we do not have the necessary public transport options in place. Project Ireland 2040 provides the funding basis to deliver the public transport expansion Dublin needs, so go on and do it.

I have brought forward a detailed policy on improving public transport by making it free in our capital city. We can ensure more people use public transport by not charging for it, as is the case in Luxembourg city and other progressive cities across the world. This will benefit the environment and people on low incomes. It will require extra investment in the Luas and suburban rail and buses, but it will alleviate traffic congestion and make the city more environmentally safe for this and future generations.

The city council has to play an active role in funding and planning for Dublin’s transport needs, irrespective of what [Transport Minister] Shane Ross says. Our capital city is bursting at the seams and gridlock is a daily issue, costing businesses and individuals time and money. Free public transport would cut congestion, benefit the environment and, most importantly, it would be a progressive, socially inclusive measure that would help low-paid workers and young people with little disposable income as a result of spiralling rents and bloated mortgages.

For those concerned that free public transport will inflict an unaffordable charge on the exchequer, it is worth noting that public transport in Dublin is already heavily subsidised. In 1999, the government introduced the Taxsaver [Commuter Ticket] Scheme, which incentivises people to use public transport to and from work, and, in some cases, results in savings of over 50 percent of the regular ticket price.

The city council should have a hands-on role in delivering free public transport for Dublin, a measure which would also make our capital more attractive to tourists. This in itself will generate more income for investment in a better and more environmentally friendly transport infrastructure. This can be done if the city council is prepared to take a stand on it and push my policy. Free public transport will mean better public transport. By going the whole way and abolishing ticket charges on public transport, we can help tackle air pollution and get Dublin moving more freely. Surely this is a worthwhile investment in our capital city’s future?

We could be using our local property tax (LPT) to improve it. Free transport around the city is achievable if we can apply the will.

Sinn Féin advocates a multi-annual programme to make public transport accessible for citizens with a disability. Sinn Féin supports the greater streamlining of our transport infrastructure across Dublin. Transport needs to be modern and future-proofed as part of a modern infrastructure system. In terms of the MetroLink and BusConnect proposals, which plan to radically overhaul transport, we have made submissions ensuring that transport is more efficient and accessible, particularly for those with disabilities and our elderly citizens.

Most importantly, I would campaign for power over public transport in Dublin to be brought from national government to local. I would also campaign for the National Transport Authority to be scrapped, and replaced with a public transport company, such as a revitalised CIÉ. These changes would enable us in Dublin to ensure that our public transport is not sold off to private companies, and also to ensure that transport decisions that affect Dublin are taken by those who represent Dublin. It makes no sense for transport for our capital city to be a national government responsibility.

Unfortunately, without this, the amount that local government can do to improve public transport (i.e. buses, trams and trains) is very limited. Some specific actions that could be taken at a local level to improve life for cyclists and pedestrians however would include: 1) ensuring a greater percentage of the city's roads maintenance budget is spent on footpaths, cycle-lane maintenance, and proper marking of cycle lanes, and making our streets walkable, rather than all being spent on roads maintenance, which overwhelmingly benefits car users; 2) increase the levy on corporations building in our cities, so that the damage done by HGVs and other construction traffic can be properly remedied.

 

Continue to make sure the roads are safe for all users. Develop cycle plans that will actually work and be of benefit to all. Most importantly keep the road maintenance at high spec. Some of our roads and cycle tracks are in horrific conditions.

PBP supports a major expansion of cycling across the city. While levels of cycling have increased in recent years, many people are afraid to cycle as it is too dangerous. PBP wants:

1) To create proper cycleways. We need safe cycleways that are separated from cars and pedestrians. This will mean using soft barriers to demarcate them.

2) To make more free bicycles available. For a limited deposit, people, should be able to pick up a bicycle and leave it back in a different space. We aim to expand the free bike scheme, run by the council itself.

Yes. I am pleased to say one going into my area: Spencer Dock to North Strand.

The 2016 Census showed that cycling was the fastest growing form of transport in Dublin in the previous five years. However, the cycling infrastructure is woefully inadequate. Safe, segregated cycle lanes are necessary along travel routes to work and to school, in particular. The announcement this month by the National Transport Authority (NTA) that the Liffey Cycle Route was finally selected is to be greatly welcomed. It will provide safe cycling from the Phoenix Park to the sea along the Quays.

The recently announced ambitious plans by BusConnects to provide 200 kilometers of cycle lanes in the city are also welcome. I would extend the Dublinbikes scheme to every area in the city and encourage the other Dublin local authorities to establish their own bikes scheme.

Segregated cycle lanes are the way to go. Let's beef up the staffing in our local authorities and set up a Dublin Cycling Office that will co-ordinate cycling improvements for the entire city. We'll also need to put [Transport] Minister [Shane] Ross under pressure, as we are only receiving a drip-feed of funding. This means that we're only two phases along with DublinBikes, despite having a plan for fifteen phases. We also need to speed up the roll-out of cycle parking and allow the public to nominate where they want to see new cycle parking.

Increase in the bicycle lanes and make them also available for the e-scooters in order to avoid the e-scooters riding on the pavements and posing the danger to pedestrians.

Improve safety measures for cyclists across the city with increased campaigns and safety training for public-service drivers. Review cycle lanes on the busiest roads and junctions in the city centre and address congestion issues during peak hours.

The current BusConnects project plans to develop 200 kilometres of cycle lanes across the city. Sinn Féin is supportive of initiatives that provide greater cycling opportunities for cyclists in a safer and accessible way. Cycling is better for one’s health and is environmentally friendly, however the introduction of new cycling lanes must be developed in line with community consultation.

While much of this is decided at national level, I support the campaign for a 10 percent minimum allocation of the national transport budget providing for cycling nationally.

–I support increasing the capacity of city-centre bike parking, in particular, so we can increase local businesses and decrease congestion in our streets.

–I will fight to keep to cycle lanes free from parked cars by supporting enforcement of fines for those who park in cycle lanes.

–Ensure that local road works prioritise the repair and consistent cleaning of cycle paths.

–Support cycle lane segregation initatives to keep our streets safe for cyclists.

–I welcome the developments of the Liffey Cycle Route and the creation of the walking and cycling officer post within Dublin City Council.

I support building cycling lanes to make cycling in our city much safer. I also believe that this should be done in consultation with local communities so that we can make sure that our communities are safer, less clogged with traffic and greener for all.

Dublin is a very crowded city. It saddens me to see that the use of alternative transport, such as bicycles, scooters and electric scooters is not promoted enough. And I cannot understand why people with electric scooters are fined by the authorities, instead of welcoming this alternative to road transport. I was recently in Warsaw and I was amazed by the numbers of electric scooters on the streets. They even have a city company that offers the same service as DublinBike but they use electric scooters instead. People should be encouraged to use alternative means of transportation and Dublin should invest in infrastructure for this. It's good for the environment, it's good for health and it would ease the crowding on the streets.

If re-elected, I will seek as part of a coalition agreement that the Liffey Cycle Route is delivered during the lifetime of the next council. I have worked hard to advance the Royal Canal Greenway between Guild Street and Ashtown and I want ensure that these important cycling infrastructure projects are delivered. But in a way, these projects are much about walking infrastructure and realm enhancements as they are cycling infrastructure but must be delivered throughout the next five years.

We need better cycling infrastructure as this dovetails with my plan for free and environmentally sustainable public transport. We need more dedicated cycleways throughout the city that are safe, especially for children to use. After an initial consultation process with the public, the city council should produce an annual report on the upkeep of cycleways and plans to expand their footprint throughout the city. An increased percentage of the local and national transport budget must be allocated to cycleways, as if cycling facilities are better, more people will use this healthy and sustainable means of getting around. I would also look at extending the the Cycle to Work Scheme, which is a tax incentive scheme that aims to encourage employees to cycle to and from work, by seeing how the city council can make an additional contribution.

We give near €20 million out of our LPT each year to central government for other underfunded councils. This money could help with better public transport and improving our cycling infrastructure.

The current BusConnects project plans to develop 200 kilometres of cycle lanes across the city. Sinn Féin is supportive of initiatives which provide greater cycling opportunities for cyclists in a safer and accessible way. Cycling is better for one’s health and is environmentally friendly. However the introduction of new cycling lanes must be developed in line with community consultation.

The Workers' Party on Dublin City Council would ensure that the position of cycling and walking officer is funded and filled. I would advocate for this position to have a specific focus on liaising with schools, to identify and amend local obstacles to school children cycling or walking to school. I would propose and vote for the reallocation of funds in the city's budget from roads maintenance, to specific cycle lane maintenance, and painting to ensure cycle lanes are properly marked.

I would support and propose as many cycle lanes of possible to be segregated and physically separate from traffic, including removing or relocating parking if possible. I will continue my party's full support for initiatives including the Liffey Cycle Route.

 

Continue to call on people to reduce, reuse and recycle. Start with the council and the Dáil. It should be all paperless and plastic should be banned. I would call on the government to fund this better and more adequately so that we are all working towards helping our planet. I would also support my party in calling for big multinational companies to be held accountable for the carbon footprints.

Above I have listed actions that will contribute to combatting climate change by expanding public transport and cycling across the city. PBP stand for a major programme of retrofitting homes in order to save energy and reduce energy bills. New builds should be to near zero energy standards. PBP has opposed the carbon tax as an unfair tax on working people and called for a levy on corporate polluters to reduce emissions and to pay for the necessary investment in transport and buildings to reduce fossil-fuel use.

We all have a role to play in this important area.

Climate change is the global challenge for us all. Ireland has a dismal record in almost every sphere. Our schoolchildren had to march on Dáil Eireann recently to remind us, the adult population, that our negligent behavior was jeopardizing their future and the future of the entire world.

If elected to the city council I will seek to establish stringent targets for an electrified rail, bus and taxi fleet in the city and place a deadline on the use of diesel and petrol in private vehicles. Dublin is a signatory to the Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy (2008). That covenant contains a comprehensive set of proposals for reducing CO2 emissions and achieving and exceeding EU energy targets. A new Strategic Policy Committee (SPC) should be established to deal with climate change.

Along with Cllr Claire Byrne I've co-chaired a Climate Action Committee of the city council. Our draft plan will hopefully be approved at the May city council meeting. The plan only tackles the city council's own emissions, so we'll also seek funding from government to tackle fuel poverty by bring our homes up to an A energy rating, and make it easier to walk and cycle around town.

Switch to electric cars/bicycles/e-scooters and increase the installation of the home solar panels and other renewable energy technologies.

Carbon taxing homes is not the solution to climate change and is only taxing families when it’s big companies, oil and gas companies for example, that should be taxed over carbon. We need to look at phasing out all fossil fuels and encourage investment in renewable energy sources.

Sinn Féin recently published a comprehensive report on our climate change proposals, which deals with sustainable transport, waste management, housing and the built environment, agriculture, energy security, education, citizen and community engagement. The full report is available [here] (https://www.sinnfein.ie/files/2019/Climate_Minority_Report.pdf).

Transport, agriculture and so on all have an impact here. It's a multifaceted problem, though, and on a local level we can make a real difference. Above all, sustainable transport development is key.

–Support efforts on national level for the development of clean home-heating efforts.

–Promote regular tree planting within residential estates to support local wildlife.

We have less than twelve and a half years to stop the worst effects of climate change from happening. There’s no doubt about it – this is an emergency. I support keeping oil and gas in the ground where it belongs, and investing in new and renewable energy sources. I think that Dublin City Council has a massive part to play in developing a climate strategy that really delivers and I want to be on the forefront of this.

As per the previous answer, the council should take into consideration promoting alternative transport. Too many cars on the streets are adding to the pollution but there is not enough infrastructure for people to be convinced that they can use alternative transportation safely. I've also sadly noticed that I don't see as many fish in the Liffey as I did years ago. This is the fault of people who throw garbage in the river. If you take a stroll along the Liffey you will see too much garbage when the tide is low. People should also act more responsibly and not use the riverbed as a dumping site.

While one individual councillor cannot change things, councillors collectively can and we must do so on a municipal level but also we need to work with government too. At a local level, for example, we must ensure that the next Dublin City Council Development Plan must have at its heart, environmentally sustainable measures that new buildings and development have to comply with.

On a national level, we need to make Ireland a leader in responding to climate change. That means developing and implementing an all-of-government plan that will help to decarbonise our electricity supply. Currently we are aiming for a 55 percent renewable energy target by 2030. In our climate plan we will be stepping up this ambition to 70 percent. This means that by 2030, 70 percent of our electricity will be generated from renewable sources.

Under Project Ireland 2040, €21.8 billion is committed to the objective of transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient society; this means that 1 in every 5 euros in Project Ireland 2040 will go towards climate action. This is the highest amount allocated to any of the ten national strategic objectives in the plan.

Having a public transport system that is efficient, sustainable and that cuts the number of private car journeys would be a great help in addressing climate change. That is why I am putting free public transport for Dublin at the core of my campaign and at the heart of my political agenda. This will hugely reduce damaging emissions and keep our capital moving in a clean, green manner.

My background is in education so people will also understand that I believe learning is important. We need to ensure the importance of good environmental behaviour is an integral part of the school curriculum at primary and secondary levels. It makes no sense to me that geography, where young people learn about the damage climate change can do to our communities and to the planet, has been dropped as a core Junior Cert subject and I will be fighting to have this subject and history restored in our schools.

It was great to see so many young people take to the streets and staging a protest to express concerns about the lack of action on climate change. I share this concern and the city council needs to do more. Climate change is about the future of our city, our country and our planet. Dublin has to play a part. Therefore, I will be asking that every single full plenary meeting of Dublin City Council proposes on its agenda at least one measure to tackle climate change.

If we can improve our public services like transportation, then we can encourage people to leave their cars at home. This would make a massive difference to the climate issues we face. We should also be looking to make all DCC vehicles climate friendly

Sinn Féin recently published a comprehensive report on our climate change proposals, which deals with sustainable transport, waste management, housing and the built environment, agriculture, energy security, education, citizen and community engagement. The full report is available [here] (https://www.sinnfein.ie/files/2019/Climate_Minority_Report.pdf).

Climate change is fundamentally something which needs to be tackled by national government. The Workers' Party's view is that it requires state investment in large-scale transition of our economy away from dirty industry and towards publicly-owned companies that provide good jobs and clean industry and infrastructure. Small changes are not going to solve the climate crisis. We need a massive economic transition, and that is not something local government can provide. At a local level, probably the biggest difference we could make is to take bins back into public ownership so we can actively reduce waste and do recycling in a way that prioritises the environment over profits of companies like Greyhound, who just export our recycling.

 

I would continue to call on this to be funded more. Since the privatisation on the bin service it has progressively got worse. We need better plans in place, more staff, more litter wardens that actually catch the perpetrators and follow through with fines. I would also support naming and shaming those caught in the act of illegal dumping. This is on my election manifesto.

PBP want to take bin collection back into control of the councils: the privatisation of the bin service is a disaster. Waste companies are charging high prices – then dodging their tax obligation by locating in the Isle of Man. Waste is being dumped around the city by those who cannot afford to pay, creating a health hazard. It needs to be brought back under public ownership. We need more smart bins around the city that can use solar power to decompose waste. The Dublin councils should organise an annual "big waste collection" for recyclable furniture and make it available free for those who need it. PBP want to work to make Dublin plastic-free. Ban single-use plastic in all public buildings. Impose special rate charges on supermarkets who use needless plastic wrapping.

Illegal dumping must stop and dog owners must clean up after their dog's poo. It’s a big issue in the city. I call for more dog and litter wardens to address this.

Litter, dog poo and illegal dumping is a problem in many parts of the city. I believe the carrot and stick is the approach that is most likely to succeed. Good civic education in the home and school will teach children to have respect for their environment and for their neighbour. Many communities now engage in neighborhood clean-ups which bring people together to create local pride of place.

However, there are areas where littering and dumping are endemic. In these areas CCTV should be used more extensively and bags of dumped rubbish should be checked more rigorously for identification. Landlord accommodation should be checked regularly to ensure that there is adequate storage space for tenants’ rubbish and landlords should be made responsible for ensuring that their tenants are registered with a reputable waste disposal company. The city council must lead the way and engage more proactively with local communities.

–Publish the names of those convicted of littering online and in the local papers.

–Produce and distribute a simple one page leaflet in English and other useful languages that explains how to dispose of your rubbish legally and where to buy bin bags/tags.

–Place CCTV and signage in areas that have a high incidence of illegal dumping. Use still images from CCTV with the faces pixellated on posters to name and shame serial offenders.

–Run a competition to design an app that would streamline the reporting of illegally dumped waste from smart phones, or consider publicising existing apps.

–Allocate the amount of litter wardens to areas proportionate to the amount of illegal waste and dumping.

–Distribute two free ‘"pooper-scooper bags", envelopes and an information leaflet when people apply for or renew their dog licence, and increase the number of bins for dog waste.

–Publicise the Dublin City Council Litter hotline (1800 248 348) and the yearly free bulk-waste collection for large household items.

–Seek changes in the private rental tenancy legislation to ensure that landlords make clear how waste will be disposed of in rental agreements.

–Place a small sign on a utility pole at the end of each street stating what days of the month the street or road will be cleaned, along with contact details for the council.

–Provide a mandatory domestic waste-collection service for multi-occupancy units and bill the owners.

Increase the number of the special bins for dog litter next to the regular bins on the streets and in the parks. Increase number of the street-cleaning services with the special equipment/cleaning machines. Educate people on the issue via public ads like the ones for binning the gum at the bus stops.

Increase surveillance and fines in the areas where dumping is most prevalent. Arrange special collections for items that cannot go out in regular bins or recycling bins. Mattresses, pillows, electrical items and other household items could be collected once per quarter to reduce the dumping of these items. Provide more specialised bins in parks and walk ways for dog poo and staff regularly on patrol to enforce fines. Increase awareness of the issue with targeted media and social-media campaigns and talks in schools to educate the future generations.

Last year, my colleagues in Dublin Central Sinn Féin launched the Clean Our Streets campaign, expressing concern at the increase in litter levels in Dublin city centre and in other disadvantaged areas of the city. In 2017 alone, Dublin City Council dealt with 6,000 bags of illegally dumped waste. A survey carried out by Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) found that a "lack of community involvement" and an "absence of pride in the locality of these areas" are major problems for areas such as Dublin’s north inner-city. This is a problem that I am keen to address. As part of our Clean Our Streets Campaign, Sinn Féin aims to create greater awareness on the state of the streets across Dublin. The Sinn Féin action plan seeks to increase the use of CCTV to detect offenders, increase the number of wardens across Dublin Central, increase Dublin City Council investment toward street cleaning, and improve public awareness about the implications of illegal dumping.

The key way of tackling these problems is through building a sense of shared responsibility in caring for the area you live in. Litter is a scourge on our environment and it is a key priority to tackle if elected.

–Fight to end the privatisation of waste collection services and the re-introduction of the low-income household waste-collection subsidy.

–An increase in the community wardens budget for increased enforcement patrols.

–Fight to have the dog licence fees increased to fund increased enforcement and provide "pooper scoopers" bags with each new licence provided.

–Name and shame illegal dumpers online and with local public notice boards.

–Promote the development of an illegal dumping app to assist waste-collection services.

I think that enforcement of existing laws is key – and that as a city councillor I can play a vital role in making sure that city workers have the resources they need to make sure that our city is kept as a clean and healthy environment for our communities.

There are clear laws about these issues, but unfortunately they are not enforced. Way too often I see people throwing things on the street without any shame and most important – without suffering consequences. The parks are full of dog poo and people are not bothering any more to clean up after their dogs. They don't realise that they'll return to the same park or street that will get dirtier with every day going by. The authorities should take a tough approach to these matters and enforce the law. It's embarrassing how dirty Dublin had become, especially in city centre.

When it comes to tackling illegal dumping, I have a very simple view. The most effective deterrent to combating illegal dumping and littering is to NAME AND SHAME. If Revenue can name and shame tax defaulters, then I believe local authorities like Dublin City Council should be permitted to name and shame those who illegally dumped rubbish. This would be done be erecting CCTV in areas where dumping or littering is more prevalent, using the images captured and subsequently erect posters with those images on them. Where this approach has been used to date in the city centre and in Phibsborough it has proved to be most effective.

There is no excuse for this behaviour. I think the penalties are too soft. Illegal dumping is a deliberate attack on the community and our shared environment. I will be examining ways to ensure that those who engage in this behaviour receive custodial sentences. In regard to minor littering and dog poo, people need to take more responsibility and to be proud of the civic space in which we all live. There are already fines in place for littering and not cleaning up dog poo and rightly so as these constitute a health risk. I will ask for the fines to be increased and for offenders’ names to be published on the City Council’s website and newspapers as a further deterrent.

The north inner-city is routinely the number one black spot in the country for illegal dumping and litter. Dog fouling has become a major issue also. If elected, I want to go into schools and local clubs to encourage a change in attitude towards these issues.

Last year, my colleagues in Dublin Central Sinn Féin launched the Clean Our Streets campaign, expressing concern at the increase in litter levels in Dublin city centre and in other disadvantaged areas of the city. In 2017 alone, Dublin City Council dealt with 6,000 bags of illegally dumped waste. A survey carried out by Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) found that a "lack of community involvement" and an "absence of pride in the locality of these areas" are major problems for areas such as Dublin’s north inner-city. This is a problem that I am keen to address. As part of our Clean Our Streets Campaign, Sinn Féin aims to create greater awareness on the state of the streets across Dublin. The Sinn Féin action plan seeks to increase the use of CCTV to detect offenders, increase the number of wardens across Dublin Central, increase Dublin City Council investment toward street cleaning, and improve public awareness about the implications of illegal dumping.

I would propose and push for Dublin City Council to take bin collection back into public ownership. This is the only solution to the growing problems of litter and illegal dumping. The Workers' Party have fully costed a public bin service, which would be funded through a number of innovative local revenue-raising initiatives, and through the establishment of a national, public recycling centre under the auspices of a repurposed Bord Na Móna. By taking recycling into public ownership, we the people would own the funds made from recycling – and this could be reinvested in a public bin collection service, instead of going into the pockets of private companies. We would propose the funding of a large expansion in public litter bins, and continue to oppose the removal of litter bins as a "solution" to illegal dumping. On Dublin City Council, we secured the inclusion of a new commitment in Dublin's litter management plan that commits Dublin City Council to not automatically removing litter bins when they attract illegal dumping. We support the mandatory DNA-sampling of dogs, so that dog poo can be linked to owners, and they can be held accountable. I would also propose the introduction of specific "dog zones" in public parks.

 

I am currently the chair of the [Dublin City Council's] parks sub-committee. I would look to keep that committee going and continue to be on it. In the north-west inner-city we are very lucky with the green spaces we have. However I would continue to call for the ones we have to be properly maintained and for security to be increased on some of them. I would tackle that issue whilst supporting the delivery of other smaller green spaces where possible.

We need to restore a sense of community and fight social isolation. We will create "urban living rooms", which are places where people can sit down and chat to strangers. Dublin needs more green spaces. Planning standards recommend devoting 15–20 percent of the land in cities to open green spaces. Phoenix Park is clearly a large open space – but smaller open spaces are needed in built-up areas. Currently, Dublin City Council appears to have an "in-fill" approach to new housing, but this sometimes involves taking away green spaces from neighbourhoods, as occurred at Weaver Square in the Liberties. People Before Profit will adopt a planning strategy of 10–15 percent green space for each electoral division. We shall also push for parklets – the use of waste empty space for art installations and seating and planting. A recent study ranked children’s mobility in Ireland in 12th place out of 16 countries, and found that only 17 percent of children surveyed walk to school, compared to 47 percent in 1981. Children have less free areas to play because the city is shaped by profit and designed for cars. Planning must be linked to the provision of more playgrounds and more informal spaces for play.

It is not an easy matter to increase the number of parks and green spaces in the city as space is at a premium. In the first instance existing green space must be preserved. For example, BusConnects and the MetroLink have proposals which would encroach on significant chunks of green space along their routes through the city. This should be avoided at all costs.

Good planning is a way to provide new parks and green spaces. Rather than each planning application standing alone and making provision for a sliver of greenery, good planning practice could require a pooling of green spaces into a coherent larger space or a public park.

Thankfully we've opened up the Croppies Acre park to the public in recent years. We now need to roll out more on-street tree planting, and pocket parks with a tree, a bench, and a patch of grass where parents can bring young children without having to cross a road. Some parks (such as the one by the Mater Hospital) are still closed, and I'll try and push our staff to open these small parks to the public once more, as well as seek publicly accessible green space in new developments.

Increase the conversion of unused public spaces into the parks and planting more trees around the city.

Use existing landbanks and vacant unused sites to convert into public green areas. Safe zones for families to walk, children to play and central to community life.

Given the significant construction rate in our city, it’s difficult to increase the number of parks and green spaces so our priority should be at least to preserve existing parks and green spaces and ensure that such facilities are made available and accessible to people. Our local TD Mary Lou McDonald has worked closely with individuals who have worked to develop green spaces across Dublin Central. My colleague Belinda Nugent and her husband Trevor worked with the local community to develop a community garden in Summerhill, where people can grow fruits and crops in a safe environment. This is an excellent example of community empowerment.

While there are few green spaces available within Dublin’s north inner-city, future developments must protect the green space we have. The planting of fruit trees within certain areas would increase opportunities for bees to pollinate and help promote local biodiversity.

I believe that public green spaces, especially near public-housing projects are essential. As a councillor I will push for these to be included in the plans we make for our city.

Luckily Dublin has plenty of green spaces and parks. There might be some areas where more can be done, but I think it's important to focus on maintaining the parks and green areas that we have in the city.

I believe the strategy adopted in the North East Inner City recently is a template that can be utilised across the city. The Greening Strategy prepared by the Fine Gael-led Government’s NEIC Initiative with the Parks Department of Dublin City Council has prepared short-term and longer-term projects to increase the amount of public parks and green spaces in the North East Inner City.

Shorter-term measures include the greening of traffic islands along the North Circular Road, planting green walls in the North Wall or enhancing the current space surrounding the East Wall Recreation Centre on Russell Avenue. Another method of introducing green space or greenery into the city centre is traffic-calming measures. I have worked with residents and Dublin City Council to develop traffic improvements in Arbour Hill and Oxmantown Road. A key feature of both projects is the enhanced level of greenery and tree planting which provides natural traffic calming measures but also a means of enhancing the public realm also.

We already have many beautiful parks and green spaces throughout the city, but as Dublin grows we will need more. I want to see existing parks and green spaces properly funded and maintained to the highest standard and this will be a big part of my work as a councillor, if I am elected. I will be asking for regular reports in this regard and will share them with constituents. As the city continues to develop, I want all new housing developments to have sufficient green spaces and I will support this being an integral party of the planning process. I also want a review undertaken of the feasibility of all new apartment buildings in the city boundaries having a safe roof garden that residents can relax in.

When I look at what's happening down on Mayor Street Lower and New Wapping Street, I feel such anger that parts of my constituency are being taken over by big business while residents are getting nothing back. Some green space is not a lot to ask for and is vitally important to people's mental health and well-being.

Given the significant construction rate in our city, it’s difficult to increase the number of parks and green spaces, so our priority should be at least to preserve existing parks and green spaces and ensure that such facilities are made available and accessible to people. Our local TD Mary Lou McDonald has worked closely with individuals who have worked to develop green spaces across Dublin Central. Both my husband Trevor and I worked with the local community to develop a community garden called North East Central Community Garden on Rutland Street Lower. Our NEC Community Garden is a space where people can grow fruits, vegetables and flowers in a safe environment. This is an excellent example of community empowerment.

An important component of this is opening up our existing green spaces, many of which remain locked or off-limits. I would strengthen measures designed to stop "gated communities" which currently mean large amounts of open space are gated off from many people in the local community (by introducing stronger protections against "gated communities" in the City Development Plan). I would increase the required provision of green space for all new apartment developments in the City Development Plan. I would propose measures to ensure all locked public parks are opened up.

 

I would support any plans that provided public spaces in the city. This is very important for the economy and for people’s well being. Civic spaces are places we should all use and protect from been taken away. I would call for the removal of some of the big sign posts around the city as well. The city doesn’t need to be a concrete jungle. I would support civic spaces for all.

As can be seen in my answer above, PBP wants a city run by the people for the people. The city needs left-wing city council that is willing to bring change. It won’t be easy because we are currently run by people who think of the city is a just a marketplace for business. Change will mean standing up to an unelected city manager who controls our local authority. We want high-quality public services, especially housing, transport and leisure facilities, provided across the city. We want public and green spaces where people of all generations can socially interact and enjoy living in a vibrant city that meets their needs rather than the needs of a wealthy elite. We want a democratic city where local communities are given a real say on issues that affect them and city officials work under the direction of elected councillors.

The proliferation of gated communities is alarming. They privatize the city and prevent other communities and citizens from engaging with each other or sharing their environment. Incidentally, they make it impossible to canvass people personally during elections which is not good for democracy. The community sector of Dublin City Council needs to be greatly strengthened and resourced. Strong open neighborhoods with good community engagement are the best places to live and work and are the best protection against crime and anti-social behavior.

We need to massively improve the public realm in Dublin. I'm working hard to take traffic out of College Green and pedestrianise it (we'll hopefully have a new application to Bord Pleanála later this year). I also want a city councillor to chair the public-realm working group and seek to provide detailed public-realm improvement plans for an improved pedestrian and cycling environment at: Cathal Brugha Street at Thomas’ Church, Parnell Square, Parnell Street; Townsend Street/D’Olier Street, Kevin Street/Patrick Street, Kevin Street/Bride Street, Merrion Row, etc.

Invest in the creation of the recreational parks. Build some kind of the small concert halls in the bigger parks in order to make them more attractive for visitors – not only during the summertime but also during the less favourable weather conditions.

Use empty spaces around local communities and convert them into family-friendly safe areas where children can play without fear. Revamp all childrens' playgrounds and green areas around Dublin city. Increase Garda patrols around existing playgrounds where drug dealing and anti-social behaviour currently prevents locals from utilising the facilities.

Existing public space in our city is already limited. Sinn Féin will fight to preserve the unique character of Dublin. We have a such a rich historical and architectural culture, which should be preserved and promoted and not subject to construction development. Dublin City Council has a responsibility to maintain such spaces and ensure that our citizens can enjoy them in a safe and clean environment.

Protect existing green spaces within the city and plant more trees within public spaces. I also support increased pedistrianisation of areas in future local development plans.

My party colleague Cllr Gary Gannon put forward a motion to halt the sale of the former Magdalene Laundry site at the Sean MacDermott Street to a Japanese budget hotel chain.

We believe this site should be a centre of commemoration of both the women who were incarcerated at this particular laundry and all those who suffered from the unimaginable abuse since the formation of the state.

As a councillor, and also a woman who has suffered the similar institutional system of Direct Provision, I will campaign to ensure that this site remains public property and honours those who have been denied basic rights and dignity by the state institutions.

This is a must! Dublin is a city filled with history and historic places. I know the struggle with the Moore Street site and I cannot understand why such an important site is not protected. Not everything can be reduced to profit and privatisation. On this issue, I believe it's very important to have public consultations where people can propose, offer ideas and solutions, as this is an issue directly related to every citizen. Historical places should be preserved and public spaces in the city should be a subject always open to debate with the citizens on the principle "nothing about me without me".

This question ties in with my answer to the previous one. Through the existing local area structures within Dublin City Council, local councillors should work with their Area Offices and the Parks Department to prepare short-term and longer-term proposals to enhance the number and quality of public green spaces within the residential communities of our city in particular.

Over the coming years, any major residential development in the city would be apartment based and that's why it’s so important that we provide as much green public space in the city as possible. For plans to be effective, I believe they must be local and the existing area structure within Dublin City Council can be best used to create and ultimately implement a programme of public park and public space enhancements across the city.

Public spaces are important to the sense of community in the city and the city council should publish within 12 months of the local elections a review of the existing public spaces alongside plans to develop more public spaces that are aesthetically and socially necessary for a city that promotes sustainable living. These public spaces belong to all of us and should be held in trust for us by the city council. I will completely oppose any efforts to privatise or sell for profit any viable public space. I also believe the re-designation of any large-scale public space for alternative use should only be sanctioned by the council if it is sanctioned by a local plebiscite. This initiative, which I will sponsor, reminds planners that the city belongs to all its people and this will allow the voice of citizens to be heard.

In regard to making our city’s public spaces a nicer place to be, it is important to face up to the realities of anti-social behaviour. The community should not have to tolerate public spaces and parks being hijacked by those who engage in anti-social behaviour. There is a major drug problem in this city. The first thing we should do is stop denying this and then we should move swiftly to tackle it. The city council has a role to play in resolving this, but so too do the Gardaí. Public spaces and parks cannot become no-go areas for ordinary citizens who do not want to be intimidated by drug-taking, drug-dealing and public drunkenness. I will use my role, if elected, to ensure that the Dublin city joint policing committees make sure that all our wonderful public amenities are safe for families and that there is a discreet but active Garda presence in the area.

I also pledge to ensure that all our public spaces and facilities are accessible to people with disabilities. Fifteen percent of the population of Dublin city have at least one disability and these citizens and their families have the same entitlement to all our public amenities as everyone else. As a candidate in this election, I am strongly supporting the Disability Federation of Ireland’s campaign to make sure all local public services are open and accessible for people who have a disability. These include housing, education, transport, leisure, and health services.

This would be a similar answer to question 9. Public space is important for a city. Thousands of people call the inner-city home and they need spaces where they can relax and enjoy their community.

Existing public space in our city is already limited. Sinn Féin will fight to preserve the unique character of Dublin. We have a such a rich historical and architectural culture, which should be preserved and promoted and not subject to construction development. Dublin City Council has a responsibility to maintain such spaces and ensure that our citizens can enjoy them in a safe and clean environment.

One clear action is to strengthen and enforce the current planning rules against "gated communities". The development plan currently sets out that these are not allowed, but this has not been enforced. Secondly, Dublin City Council should begin a process of taking private shared space (such as in the IFSC) back into public ownership. This means increasing budgets for proper maintenance of such land – the driver behind privatisation of public land is an unwillingness on the part of the state to pay for its upkeep.

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